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20121129
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. he will also talk about the 2012 election and recent meetings at the white house between congressional leaders and president obama. this is an hour and 20 minutes. >> we are delighted to have grover norquist with us. of course, he is president of americans for tax reform but in the spirit of full disclosure, he is also a member of our board of directors and a very important colleague. grover spoke here several months ago, i should say here at the center, but not in this room because we moved -- there may be some glitches, so i apologize in advance. i am sure we will do better next time. however, grover talked about taxes, u.s. economic policy. but that was about taxes and the electoral campaign. now we had elections and the taxes are at the center of a very important political debate and at the center of negotiations between the obama administration and congress, particularly the republican controlled house. as i watched the president during his recent press conference and listened to leaders of the house, i think everybody agrees it would be highly desirable to reach a c
of the issues about regulation and so now that we have the election over, we have to focus on passing the sites. we take that step and we focus on them creating these new industries, i am confident we will remain the most logical relationship. other nations was are racing or were and there is a reason to be concerned. i look at it may be optimistically by saying the losses have fall. >> michael has been an optimist and he's saying we have a chance here. can i invite some pessimism >> i am fundamentally optimistic. [laughter] >> unbelievable. a budget guy. if you think about the structure of the budget which reflects the value of evidence in the political system, we have huge programs which are basically legacy programs serving all americans and those programs are crushing the discretionary accounts, where we fund national-security, education, the core investments. this allows the path to crush of the future. it is against what they talked about. we have to agree that innovation will solve health care, educational, energy. look at what fracking has done. we're not doing any of the is thing is. >
after the election we have done nothing other than san the recovery comes as well as fighting about needing balance in terms of the budget. i do not even think the word is the appropriate word. what happens in december is the bush tax cuts for the wealthy expire, and they should expire. that has been litigated. in terms of what mitt romney's position was, what obama's position was -- the president, by the way, has gotten the greatest votes total for a reelection of any president in history. he was out there saying we need a balanced approach. we are getting out of a recession, it is still a very tenuous recovery, we need to invest in education, infrastructure. we need to find some revenues. that is part of the fight in washington in the next month. host: this so-called fiscal cliff -- you said the tax cuts should expire. what would be the impact of tax cuts expiring for the middle- class and others? guest: look, this election was about how we recreate andry imagine the american dream for those who want to be in the middle-class and those who want a broad and middle-class. of course
about hurricane sandy. the republican responses by the newly elected chairwoman of the house republican conference. she also talked about thanksgiving and said republicans were ready to work with president obama to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff. obama talked about of the obama family, i want to wish everybody a very happy thanksgiving. for us, this is a day full of ta family, i want to wish everybody a very happy thanksgiving. for us, this is a day full of family and>> on behalf friends,d football. it is a date to fight the urge to take a nap, at least until after dinner. most of all, it is a time to give thanks for each other and for the bounty we enjoy in this country. that is important this year. we have just emerged from a campaign season that was passionate, noisy, and vital to our democracy. it also required us to make choices. sometimes that led us to focus on what sets us apart rather than ties us together. thanksgiving is a chance to put it all in perspective. to remember that, despite our differences, we are americans first and foremost. today we give thanks for blessings t
. and then a look at marriage equality and voters approval of the initiatives on the balance this election year -- ballots this year. >> with soldiers on guard outside the customs house and outside the homes of crown officials and with british artillery now aimed at the house, it is easy to understand why many bostonian felt threatened. soldiers tried to stir up racial tension. of course, not everyone in boston is white. within a month of their arrival, three british officers are discovered encouraging african american slaves in boston to attack their white masters. one of those drunken officers assured the black bostonians that the soldiers had come to procure their freedom. with their help, they should be able to drive the liberty boys to the devil. the british army is not in boston to free the slaves. several white residents lodge complaints. captain wilson and his friends had engaged in a dangerous act to foment slave dissatisfaction. >> a discussion on how veterans are treated when returning from war. we will hear from: paul and general stanley mcchrystal, former commander of troops in --
at that amount of money that was spent on all the election campaigns, all of them, $6 billion. now, i was shocked by that. i moderated a discussion the other morning between karl rove and james car vill and rove's reaction -- >> how lucky can one guy be? [laughter] >> it was actually -- it was fascinating. but mr. rove made the point that we spend infinitely more than that on dog food. >> that's absurd. >> yes, it is, it is. because, as much as i have always loved our pets and loved pets in general, the fact of the matter is, if our elections end up being reduced to the snarling and shouting and innuendo, you know, people keep saying, things were worse in jefferson's time. yes, they were. but you only had broad sheets that were being distributed. you didn't have everyone walking around with his or her own little communications device. information now is spread so ubiquitously, is spread so quickly, so instantaneously, that if we don't have reliable, trustworthy, objective sources of information, then our whole electoral structure is going to collapse of its own weight. >> you know, ted, there was
to talk about him a little bit. we arrange this, i think, because we figured post-election would be a really good slow news time to come out to arizona. god knows, we could not predict the director of the cia would resign this week and the worst hurricane or storm to hit new york for 100 years hit two weeks before. i am really proud of the election coverage, which was on the tail end of the storm coverage. and i was proud of the storm coverage. you have hundreds of people reject as a one of the great things for e students to look forward to. when you are with a terrific news organization. i love what i saw here in terms of the broadcast being put on and everybody putting on what as one of the greatest facilities i have seen. the spirit -- you will see it and the local newspaper -- how important it is we are still public servants. i think so much of what happens in a news today, people forget that. they forget -- you are here as a public service. that is an important part of what we do. the idea that everybody of the hundreds of people that work at cbs news during the crazy week o
, there has been a great deal of talk since the election on whether there is new life on the immigration issue. i believe there is. we are working hard to capitalize on the momentum the election provided on this issue. we have not heard a lot about how enacting comprehensive immigration reform can help on the job and economic issues. immigration reform will create an effective system that levels the playing field for all workers. right now, our immigration system does not work for anyone except unscrupulous employers. we need to take the power out of the hands of those who are exploiting our current immigration situation and put it back into the hands of fair and honest employers. if all immigrants have equal status, employers cannot skirt immigration laws. immigration reform is the right thing to do as well as economically smart thing to do. children should not have to live in the fear of their parents' deportation every day of their lives. and the most vulnerable people in our society should not be subject to harassment. i am truly appreciative of the support we have received from the urban
to public service i found my passion. i got into education reform largely because as an elected official in washington, d.c. i would visit schools and talk to teachers. after i was elected for the first time in 1993, i would go to school and see a couple of these bright eyed kids in some of these low income communities. troubled, challenge neighborhoods. troubled, challenged schools. i said, what is that kid's story? the teacher would tell me. the kid seemed to be so energetic, so bunch potential. -- so much potential. a couple years later, i hear he got dropped out. that kid never could read. it struck me when i looked at the negative social indicators in washington, d.c. -- similar to other countries around the country -- all the negative social stuff was directly related to the lack of education. 90% of the inmates in d.c. were high-school dropouts. in terms of homelessness, joblessness, drug addiction -- there are statistics out there now that if we increase the high-school graduation rates in this country by 10%, we reduce the murder rate by 20%. all of these indicators show that th
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9